pavement; pathway; platform; hurlers triple stone circle complex. the section is part of the 15 m long by 1 m wide pavement – it was edged by a stone kerb at its southwestern end which marked a clear terminal stone (b1) with a gap of undisturbed ground (over 3 m) between it and the edge of the central stone circle. the northern end of the pavement was marked by a straggle of stones which fizzled out onto a decayed granite moorstone. again, a clear 5m gap lies between the end of the pavement and standing stone (a13) on the southern tim of the northern circle. the pavement stones are tightly packed with well defined edges. during the 2013 excavation, revealed a wide variety of stone types: granites, elvan, altered wall rock, vein material, black fault surface rock, phyllite, quartz and mica (besson 2013), many with sharp edges forming an irregular lumpy surface. colour may have been an important aspect, with pink and orange granites and shiny gold pieces of phyllite and the reflective qualities of quartz and mica. the stones were chosen from a variety of sources and the triangular ‘pyramid’ stone of projecting above the surface and placed off centre suggest that the pavement was to be observed rather that walked over. all this is might suggest a purpose more closely aligned with the notion of land art with its connection with the landscape. additionally the hurler circles has a connection it seems with the milky way rising to clear view as it does against the western horizon. this might well have been a further inspiration for the shape and organisation of the pavement with its coloured and reflective surface and projecting stones. ..#hurlers, #stonecircles, #hurlersstonecircles, #pavement, #ancientwisdom, #ancientsites, #ancientlandscape, #archaeology, #ancientart, #landart, #neolithic, #brongeage, #ancientsculpture, #ancientandmodern, #prehistory, #prehistoricart, .. #montagecity.com

pavement; pathway; platform; hurlers triple stone circle complex. the section is part of the 15 m long by 1 m wide pavement - it was edged by a stone kerb at its southwestern end which marked a clear terminal stone (b1) with a gap of undisturbed ground (over 3 m) between it and the edge of the central stone circle. the northern end of the pavement was marked by a straggle of stones which fizzled out onto a decayed granite moorstone. again, a clear 5m gap lies between the end of the pavement and standing stone (a13) on the southern tim of the northern circle. the pavement stones are tightly packed with well defined edges. during the 2013 excavation, revealed a wide variety of stone types: granites, elvan, altered wall rock, vein material, black fault surface rock, phyllite, quartz and mica (besson 2013), many with sharp edges forming an irregular lumpy surface. colour may have been an important aspect, with pink and orange granites and shiny gold pieces of phyllite and the reflective qualities of quartz and mica. the stones were chosen from a variety of sources and the triangular ‘pyramid’ stone of projecting above the surface and placed off centre suggest that the pavement was to be observed rather that walked over. all this is might suggest a purpose more closely aligned with the notion of land art with its connection with the landscape. additionally the hurler circles has a connection it seems with the milky way rising to clear view as it does against the western horizon. this might well have been a further inspiration for the shape and organisation of the pavement with its coloured and reflective surface and projecting stones. ..#hurlers, #stonecircles, #hurlersstonecircles, #pavement, #ancientwisdom, #ancientsites, #ancientlandscape, #archaeology, #ancientart, #landart, #neolithic, #brongeage, #ancientsculpture, #ancientandmodern, #prehistory, #prehistoricart, .. #montagecity.com

Leave a Reply